Networking

Establishing networks is really important when you first commence rural and remote practice. Professional and social networks will anchor you in the community and your workplace, and provide support to get yourself established.

Time spent getting to know people within your workplace and community is not time wasted! Think of it instead as an investment in your success in a remote and rural practice setting. Below are some professional and community networks to get involved in.

 

Professional Networking

Developing professional networks is a great way to establish links with other health providers, existing services, resources, and professional support. Start within staff in your immediate team and then expand out from there. Take the time to find out what other people are doing, how their role fits in with yours, and how you may be able to work together.

There several ways you can identify professional networks. Ask your manager and others within your workplace who you should connect with. Pick up the phone and call health services and private practitioners in the area. Look on the state Health Department website, search for a health service directory. Alternatively, look in the local community directory for other providers in your area.

Below is a list of possible professional networks you should explore. Look both to state health services and private practice. You may not have access to all groups, but find out who is available to you and make the most of them.

 

Within the workplace

  • Allied health staff within your discipline or professional group
  • Allied health staff outside of your discipline or professional group
  • Allied Health Assistants
  • Other health professionals within in the workplace (e.g. community health nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Diabetes educators).

 

Within the local community  

  • Allied health staff within your discipline or professional group
  • Allied health staff outside of your discipline or professional group
  • Other relevant health professionals and groups within the community (e.g. Aboriginal Medical Services, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, local General Practitioners, Divisions of General Practice, and other existing service partners).

Other links 

  • Other regional service partners
  • Allied health staff within your discipline or professional group
  • Allied health staff outside of your discipline or professional group.

 

Community Networking

Living and working in a remote or rural area is so much more than work. Getting hooked into the community will make the transition much easier and allow you to get the most out of living in a remote or rural area. However, for many of us it’s really hard work to put yourself out there, and it’s often a bit challenging knowing where to start.

Start by find out what social, sporting and cultural activities happen within the community. Visit the local shire office, tourist information centre and library, read the local newspaper, look at noticeboards, and ask people. Knowing what’s available is not enough though; you have to get actively involved. Join a team. Try something new. Never say no to an invitation. Getting involved is the best way to met new people and settle in.

Our Self Care and Community Orientation pages may also have some useful information.

 

Networking and You

  • Have you developed strong community and professional networks?
  • Have you made explored the network pathways outlined above?
  • How can networking support you role and your development?